Gender Action Plan Integrates Gender Issues into Climate Policies at COP23

Via the Women’s Major Group, one of TOU’s partners representing the rights of women worldwide in the United Nations processes on Sustainable Development:

PRESS RELEASE: Adoption of the Gender Action Plan at COP23, by Women & Gender Constituency

Adoption of the first Gender Action Plan under the UNFCCC
(United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change)
15 November 2017

 

WHAT

On Tuesday November 14, 2017, the first ever Gender Action Plan to the UNFCCC was adopted at COP23. Its overall goal is to support and enhance the implementation of the gender-related decisions and mandates so far adopted in the UNFCCC process through a set of specific activities to be conducted within the next 2 years.

 

Kalyani Raj, All India Women’s Conference

“The adoption of the Gender Action Plan (GAP) is a positive step forward. It goes to reassure some of our work at the national level particularly relating to gender integration into climate change policies and related schemes. We would be happy to work with our government at the implementation level and hope to close bigger gaps impeding gender inequality with the GAP.”

 

Bridget Burns, co-focal point of the Women and Gender Constituency and co-director of the Women’s Environment and Development Organisation (WEDO)

“We are well beyond the time for real action on gender-just climate policies.The Gender Action Plan (GAP) serves as an important accelerator in advancing multiple mandates for gender equality that exist under the UNFCCC. But, the test will be in the implementation. We will be holding governments accountable, both developed countries in putting serious financing into gender-responsive policy development as well as all countries in fulfilling human rights via their climate plans. For a truly gender-just climate change framework, we must continue to demand climate justice from the entire process.”

 

Shradha Shreejaya, Asia-Pacific Forum on Women, Law and Development (APWLD)

“The proceedings on GAP have been reassuring. Keeping in mind however the urgency of the climate crisis, especially in Asia-Pacific and Africa, we need strengthened action and solidarity from developed countries in terms of committing to finance GAP as well as Loss and Damages, something that’s still amiss from COP 23 decisions.”

 

Dinda Yura, Solidaritas Perempuan, Indonesia

“We now have Gender Action Plan, as one step of the milestones for gender equality and women’s empowerment through inclusiveness of women as well as gender sensitive and responsive policies and actions in all elements of mitigation, adaptation, capacity building, technology transfer, and finance. What we need to think and do further in the implementation is how to use GAP and mainstreaming gender justice principles and be integrated in policies and climate actions, in particularly at national and local level, to ensure there is no climate policies and actions that violate women’s rights and the rights of women can be protected in the midst of climate crisis.”

 

Gotelind Alber, board member of GenderCC – Women for Climate Justice and co-founder of the Women and Gender Constituency

“The Gender Action Plan is a milestone in our longstanding efforts to integrate gender into the international climate process. If properly implemented, resourced and monitored it bears the potential to move us closer to achieving women’s full, equal and meaningful participation in the UNFCCC process and the development and implementation of gender-responsive and human rights based climate policies in all thematic areas of the process as well as on national and sub-national levels.”

 

Priscilla M Achakpa, Director of Women’s Environmental Programme and gender expert on the Nigerian Delegation

“Now that the GAP has been adopted, it is time to work collectively from the regional to the global level while ensuring that resources and made available for the full implementation of the GAP. We cannot afford to fail, grassroots, indigenous population and communities must be fully integrated in the GAP.”

 

Anne Barre, Women Engage for a Common Future (WECF) International

“The GAP is essential because there is still so much to do to bridge the “gender gap” and have more efficient climate policies! For example in climate finance, according to the OECD 2017 report, less than 5% of climate funds have gender as a main objective. Thus women’s priorities are being totally neglected, and women have no direct access to climate funding. And yet, many innovative solutions on the ground exist today that should be  upscaled with direct access to the Green Climate Fund. In turning the patriarchal system upside down, we will be able to reach the goal of the Paris Agreement.”

 

Marta Benavides, social movements, El Salvador, Latin America

“Women have been at the forefront of human development, for women caring for the planet and the well being of nature and humans in their families and communities. The Gender Action Plan is an affirmation of that. As it is the affirmation of the indigenous peoples path. It was a historical debt for the climate process. We now expect to start working for the essentials of the climate process: to work effectively and urgently to keep global warming under 1.5°C and to move effectively on all needed levels towards a just transition and to ensure that really and for good No One Is Left Behind.”

 

WHO

The Women and Gender Constituency to the UNFCCC

 

WHEN

Tuesday, 14 November, 2017

 

WHERE

COP23 climate negotiations in Bonn, Germany

 

WHY

Climate change is one of the most daunting global challenges of our time. As changing temperatures, weather patterns, and ecological systems threaten communities all over the world, the effects will be felt differently between the global North and South, various social classes, and between men and women. Just as any disaster can exacerbate existing social differences, climate change can be expected to worsen the distinction between men, women, and gender-nonconforming individuals in terms of opportunity, safety, and general wellbeing. In addition to the looming threat posed by climate change, gender distinctions in relation to environmental issues can already be observed. According to the Women’s Environmental Development Organization (http://wedo.org,) only 12% of federal environment ministries worldwide are headed by women, as of 2015. Women on average make up 43% of the agricultural labor force in developing countries, and around 50% in sub-Saharan Africa. As of 2010, only 15% of land in sub-Saharan Africa is owned by women. Females are more likely to be killed by natural disasters and/or are systematically killed more often than males. In Malawi, gender inequalities in agriculture cost USD $100 million. At the current rate of increase, gender parity in negotiations will only be reached by 2040.

The Gender Action Plan represents a landmark opportunity to improve the quality of life for women worldwide, as well as ensure their equal representation in climate policy and planning.

 

ABOUT

The Women and Gender Constituency (WGC) is one of the nine stakeholder groups of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Established in 2009, the WGC now consists of 27 women’s and environmental civil society organizations, who are working to ensure that women’s voices and their rights are embedded in all processes and results of the UNFCCC framework, for a sustainable and just future, so that gender equality and women’s human rights are central to the ongoing discussions. As the WGC represents the voices of hundreds and thousands of people across the globe, members of the Constituency are present at each UNFCCC meeting and intersessional alongside the UNFCCC Secretariat, governments, civil society observers and other stakeholders to ensure that women’s rights and gender justice are core elements of the UNFCCC. In this action the constituency is joined by other stakeholders committed to advancing women’s human rights, peace and climate justice.

http://womengenderclimate.org

 

MORE RESOURCES

Women and Gender Constituency Key Demands:

http://womengenderclimate.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/WGCKeyDemands-1.pdf

 

2017 UN Commission on the Status of Women Report (CSW61)

The Temple of Understanding collaboratively organized three successful sessions and an interfaith service of remembrance during the 61st Annual Commission on the Status of Women

TOU board members and attendees at CSW61

 

For the overall proceedings, we suggest this report by colleague Kate Lappin, of APWLD and the Women’s Major Group, who assessed Four wins at CSW this year:

  1. Committing to gender responsive just transitions in the context of climate change
  2. Recognising the role of trade unions in addressing economic inequalities and the gender pay gap
  3. More detailed methods to ensure the redistribution of unpaid care work
  4. Referring to the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (DRIP)  [Read more]

Also recommended is the Report on CSW61 and Analysis of the Agreed Conclusions by Ms. Lakshmi Puri, UN Assistant Secretary-General and Deputy Executive Director of UN Women.

 

Interfaith Service of Remembrance, CSW61

 

This year’s interfaith service again remembered women murdered for standing up for their rights. Four months after the death of Berta Cáceres, her colleague Lesbia Yaneth Urquia was murdered for the same work: trying to stop a hydroelectric project that threatened water and land. The Council of Indigenous People of Honduras (Copinh) is quoted as writing, “The death of Lesbia Yaneth is a political femicide that tries to silence the voices of women with the courage and bravery to defend their rights.”

 

Roberto Mukaro Borrerro, Grove Harris, Betty Lyons

 

Our joint DPI/NGO session was entitled “Women as Roots of Change: Sustainable Food Production and Sovereignty.” Speakers included Sister Celine Paramunda, Medical Mission Sisters; Betty Lyons (Onondaga Nation), American Indian Law Alliance; Roberto Mukaro Borrerro, International Indian Treaty Council; and Dr. Chantal Line Carpentier, Chief, New York UNCTAD. It was a pleasure to collaborate with DPI colleagues Hawa Diallo, who brilliantly introduced the panel, and the production team including Krystal Fruscella and Chioma Onwumelu (all pictured below).

Our full crew: Women as Roots of Change DPI/NGO Session at CSW61

 

The complete session can be viewed on UN Web TV by clicking the image below: 

 

Our session “On a Gender-Just and Sustainable Trade Agenda,” co-sponsored by UNCTAD and the Women’s Major Group, both highlighted the need for more advocacy towards a gendered understanding of trade policies, and commended women’s activism in pushing for it. UNCTAD has a set of online publications that are part of their gender initiative. They write, “Taking into account gender perspectives in macro-economic policy, including trade policy, is essential to pursuing inclusive and sustainable development and to achieving fairer and beneficial outcomes for all.”

This event, held in the Ex-Press Bar, was hugely successful. The room was filled to capacity (over 80 people) and the audience included a graduate class of women training in international affairs.

Grove Harris, Kate Lappin, Chantal Line Carpentier

 

Grove Harris moderated and showed the film, Roots of Change: Food Sovereignty, Women and Eco-Justice. Speaker Kate Lappin was brilliant, explaining that development funding reverts profits back to the donor countries and further demystifying trade. Then Dr. Chantal Line Carpentier congratulated women’s activism, which has driven UNCTAD’s new gender and trade initiative. After the panel, Dr. Carpentier expressed appreciation for the opportunity to keep working with the NGO community on trade and financial concerns.

Speakers from the floor included Alina Saba, an Indigenous youth from Nepal who spoke to a community perspective, rather than an implicitly individualistic one. Nick Anton spoke on the new People’s Water Guide, and Ana Alvarez brought up the issue of corporate power. Theresa Blumenfield questioned UNCTAD’s uncritical acceptance of the corporate strategy of developing robots to avoid paying human workers.

Celine Paramunda, Crystal Simeoni, Grove Harris

 

Our session “Roots of Change: Reclaiming Economics for Women and Community” gave the audience an opportunity to exchange personal views and voice heartfelt concerns. We are especially grateful for the presence of speakers Crystal Simeoni of FEMNET and Sister Celine Paramunda of Medical Mission Sisters. Simeoni’s background in rural economic development and fighting inequality was coupled with clarity and insight. Sr. Paramunda offered heartfelt remarks on women’s leadership and spirit. She also led a brief meditation about breath and relationship, relating us to trees and the cycle of oxygen and carbon dioxide.

FEMNET, the African Women’s Development and Communication Network, offered a set of Red Flags expressing grave concerns about the direction of CSW61. Naming eighteen areas of concern, they warn, “The 61st session of the UN Commission on the Status of Women is heading toward a weak, even regressive, outcome that fails to address the current state of the world of work, let alone address future challenges.” These areas will require ongoing monitoring and activism.

 

 

Interfaith Service of Gratitude and Remembrance (CSW61)

[4/19/17 UPDATE: Scroll down for photos of this beautiful event!]

Temple of Understanding, Parliament of the World’s Religions,
Interfaith Center of New York, World Peace Prayer Society, International Yoga Day Committee at the UN,
United Religions Initiative, and United Methodist Women invite you to attend

The Third Annual Interfaith Service of Gratitude and Remembrance

Thursday, March 16, 2017, 4:45 – 6:00 PM
Church Center for the United Nations, Chapel
44th Street and First Avenue, New York

Join us in prayerful remembrance of those who have gone before us and who continue to inspire our lives. We carry their courage and commitment forward. 

There will be a time to remember those who have passed during this year.

Special music will be provided by The Performance & Peace Initiative with Brandon Perdomo on flute and Caitlin Cawley on Percussion.

  • Rev. Dionne Boissiere, Chaplain of the Church Center for the United Nations
  • Grove Harris, MDiv., The Temple of Understanding
  • Dr. Kusumita Pedersen, Interfaith Center of New York
  • Denise Scotto, Esq., International Yoga Day Committee
  • Monica Willard, United Religions Initiative

“When I dare to be powerful – to use my strength in the service of my vision – then it becomes
less and less important whether I am afraid.“ – Audre Lorde

* * * * *

Photos from the event:

Group, Interfaith Service of Remembrance, CSW61 – March 2017

 

Rev. Dionne Boissiere, Chaplain of the Church Center for the United Nations

 

Denise Scotto, Esq., International Yoga Day Committee

 

Grove Harris, Temple of Understanding

 

Monica Willard, United Religions Initiative

 

Group, Interfaith Service of Remembrance, CSW61 – March 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Women as Roots of Change: Sustainable Food Production and Sovereignty (CSW61)

The UN Department of Public Information (DPI),
in partnership with the Temple of Understanding, presents

Women as Roots of Change: Sustainable Food Production and Sovereignty

Part of the 61st Commission on the Status of Women (Side Event)

 Thursday, March 23, 2017, 11 am – 12:45 pm
Conference Room 2, United Nations Headquarters, New York

 

Building on the intersections between Sustainable Development Goals 2, 5, and 6, this briefing will feature the voices of Indigenous people and highlight women’s leadership role in sustainable food production and sovereignty.

Featuring:

  • Sister Celine Paramunda, Medical Mission Sisters
  • Betty Lyons (Onondaga Nation), American Indian Law Alliance
  • Roberto Mukaro Borrerro, International Indian Treaty Council
  • Dr. Chantal Line Carpentier, Chief, New York UNCTAD

The relevant Sustainable Development Goals include:

2. Zero Hunger
5. Gender Equality
6. Clean Water and Sanitation

The Temple is extremely grateful to Tribal Link for their collaboration on this event.

 

 

 

Click for PDF flyer >>

 

 

Roots of Change: Reclaiming Economics for Women and Community (CSW61)

Roots of Change: Reclaiming Economics for Women and Community

Part of the 61st Commission on the Status of Women

Thursday, March 16, 10:30 am
Salvation Army, Downstairs
221 E 52nd Street, New York, NY 10022

 

Women’s opportunity and necessity has traditionally been in farming and textiles. It is crucial to re-vision women’s roles in a broader context. Women’s economic empowerment needs to involve equity, ownership, and a community focus. Our 10-minute film Roots of Change: Food Sovereignty, Women and Eco-Justice demonstrates the dangers we face as corporations replace local family farms and fisheries. It features women’s perspectives and includes men on all levels, suggesting the values we need to foster in order to reclaim our economic future.

Speakers will address concerns such as loss of local knowledge, community based solutions, innovative practices, and the impacts of international trade. In our interconnected world, women’s empowerment lies in a robust local community as well as justice in the global community.

Speakers:

  • Sister Celine Paramunda, Medical Mission Sisters
  • Crystal Simeoni, FEMNET
  • Grove Harris, Temple of Understanding

Co-sponsored by the Temple of Understanding, the Women’s Major Group, and the Mining Working Group.

The Elusive Woman Secretary-General #UN

The UN General Assembly elected its next Secretary-General on October 13 — António Guterres of Portugal, the ninth man to hold the position. Ambassador Anwarul Chowdhury, former Under-Secretary-General and High Representative of the UN, spoke on his disappointment that the position has not yet been held by a woman.

Ambassador Anwarul Chowdhury

Ambassador Anwarul Chowdhury

The Council members were totally insensitive to a groundswell of support worldwide for a woman as the next Secretary-General. They advanced the legacy of ignoring the 50 per cent of humanity in their action. This is an absolute aberration of the system whereby the 15 members of the Council impose their choice prompted by P-5 pressure and manipulation upon the total membership of 193, not to speak of wide swath of civil society opinion and activism for a woman Secretary-General.

It is so very unfortunate that in the selection process politics has trumped women’s equality, violating UN Charter’s article 8 which underscores the eligibility and equality of men and women to participate in any capacity in all its organs – principal or subsidiary.

Read more on the Inter Press Service >>

Short Film on Food Sovereignty and Women by TOU, Oct. 24 Premiere in NYC

Roots of Change: Food Sovereignty, Women, and Eco-Justice

Update: Watch This Film Now! >>

Premiere and Discussion

with
Dr. Chantal Line Carpentier
(Chief, New York UNCTAD)
Dr. Azza Karam (UNFPA)
speakers from the film and audience members

Monday, October 24, 2-4 PM
Church Center at the United Nations
2nd Floor Conference Room
1st Ave and 44th St., NYC

“We can no longer afford to keep women at bay, to keep them 
from the resources that they need to be able to grow food, 
to be able to feed their families, to be able to feed their communities,
to bring their knowledge and their leadership to the fore.”
–Grove Harris, Roots of Change


Roots of Change
 features women’s spirited calls to change our global direction. In this visually striking short film, women warn of the current realities and looming threats of food crisis, climate change, and corruption. Women’s leadership and ownership in local systems of food production are desperately needed–as is the collaboration of their husbands, brothers, fathers, and sons. This leadership and ownership is what is meant by food sovereignty.

Roots0fChange_TOU-002-african-women

Through grassroots activism and transformation of global trade, people can work to curb exploitation of people and the planet. Foreign direct investment must be shaped to benefit women and Indigenous people. Additionally, people’s rights to commonly held resources such as water and agricultural land must be protected.The UN’s Sustainable Development Goals were designed to address the root causes of inequality. Both education and financial resources are required to address needs such as clean water and sanitation, nourishing food, and affordable clean energy. But the sustainability goals cannot be met without the full participation of women. Their effort and knowledge is needed to move forward, to develop diversified agricultural systems that will sustain humanity through the crisis of global climate change.

Roots of Change envisions a revolution in values that will result in clean water and nourishing food for all: a global culture in harmony with the environment that values relationships more than things. Only with a radical system shift that liberates the voices and bodies of women can we achieve a future that is healthy, diverse, peaceful, and whole.

Speakers in the film come from the Temple of Understanding’s events at the Commission on the Status of Women, the annual forum for advocacy on women’s issues at the United Nations.

Tea and cookies will be served.

Women lead Friday prayers at Denmark’s first female-run mosque

Via The Guardian, February 2016:

220px-Islamic_Feminism_Symbol.svgWomen lead Friday prayers at Denmark’s first female-run mosque
Imam of Mariam mosque in Copenhagen says aim is to challenge patriarchal structures and inspire other women

A little bit of history was made in Copenhagen this week with the first Friday prayers led by two female imams, marking the official opening of the first female-led mosque in Scandinavia, and one of only a handful worldwide outside China.

More than 60 women crammed into the Mariam mosque above a fast-food outlet in a city centre street. Volunteers had worked late into Thursday night to put the final touches on the premises’ refurbishment. Cream curtains with a subtle mosaic-motif trim had been hung, a calligraphed verse from the Qur’an displayed, flowers and candles arranged.

Sherin Khankan and Saliha Marie Fetteh, the mosque’s two imams, shared the ceremony. Khankan sang the adhan and made an opening speech, and Fetteh delivered the khutbah, or sermon, on the theme of “women and Islam in a modern world”.

Only a passing mention was made of burkinis. To laughter, Fetteh told the worshippers that, according to newspaper reports, there was not one burkini to be found in shops across Europe, after a series of bans in French cities and resortshad prompted Muslim and non-Muslim women to buy them in acts of solidarity.

Read more on Denmark’s first female-run mosque >>

Resources on Women, Religion, and Rights from the UN

 

Realizing the Faith DividendRealizing the Faith Dividend: Religion, Gender, Peace and Security in Agenda 2030

This report focuses on the role of religious actors and religious considerations in the SDG agenda, particularly as they pertain to gender equality, peaceful coexistence and security considerations. The perspectives, ideas and initiatives discussed in these pages bring together experiences and policy analysis shared from the different realities of Donors, UN agencies and Faith-Based NGOs. The narratives build on and inform policies — required at a time when religion is predominantly viewed as an emerging challenge.

 

b1e2f580d5f9903ff82457c6bc548cc7Religion, Women’s Health and Rights: Points of Contention, Paths of Opportunity

This white paper looks at the religious arguments around some of the most sensitive and contentious gender-related issues from the perspective of the major faith traditions, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. An article noting thisrReport and its launch in Oslo in May, was published in the Huffington Post, penned by one of the key consultants who compiled this for UNFPA and Norad. The article can be found here.

Women, Faith and Human Rights Report – New from UNFPA

Gathering honest and critical thinking by women and men of faith and human rights actors, the new Women, Faith, and Human Rights report from the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and the Church of Sweden has the following goals:

  • To contribute to a broader and deeper understanding of the relation between faith and human rights, particularly around issues of SRHR [sexual and reproductive health and rights] and population dynamics.
  • To challenge the notion that there per definition is a conflict between faith and human rights in general and women’s rights in particular.
  • To make the positions of faith-based women in leadership visible and to convey their experiences and views to UN missions and UN agencies.
  • To inspire women in leadership to build networks that add an important voice to the global women’s movement engaged in active UN advocacy around gender equality and women and girls’ rights.

Download the full-color Women, Faith, and Human Rights report here >>