Moral Imperative Initiative

References for the Advocacy Working Group
of the Moral Imperative Initiative
by Faith Based groups working at the United Nations

As part of our work to create multifaith moral arguments to change behavior towards our planet, we are collecting and drafting templates for consideration:

We will use these in our work with the executive committee and the outreach committee.

We are collecting existing advocacy tool kits:

We are collecting other faith-based advocacy materials:

We anticipate participating in a side event prior to the UN General Assembly next September in NYC.

While this page is intended as a working site for group members, if you are reading this with interest please feel free to email potential materials for inclusion to groveharris (at) gmail.com.

What’s New with the Moral Imperative? Click for articles >>

 

Overview

Global Religious and Faith-Based Organization Leaders Issue Call and
Commitment to End Extreme Poverty by 2030 >>

The announcement from global faith leaders arose from the World Bank’s “Faith Based and Religious Leaders Roundtable” held on February 18 (2015), the first high-level meeting between World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim and faith leaders…. Endorsers are committed to galvanizing greater commitment and action from within the faith community globally and across every sector to end extreme poverty.

The statement, Ending Extreme Poverty: A Moral and Spiritual Imperative, is available online.

In April 2015, over 40 global religious and faith-based organization leaders issued a “Moral and Spiritual Imperative to End Extreme Poverty” in an event sponsored by the World Bank Group. A diverse group of multi-faith leaders, the World Bank Faith Initiative and the UN Inter-Agency Task Force on Religion and Development worked collaboratively to develop a Faith-based Action Framework to End Extreme Poverty and Realize the SDGs, which outlines a series of strategies that faith leaders and communities are committed to in order to help end the scourge of extreme poverty and advance sustainable development.

The Framework was discussed and affirmed during a strategy session of FBO and religious leaders on the 24 September 2015 in New York. It was organized around three core commitments that emanate from the moral imperative statement: 1) generate and be guided by evidence, 2) advocate around implementation and to increase accountability, 3) foster effective and greater collaboration. One of the outcomes from this event was to establish 3 working groups to discern on the best way to engage a broader array of faith leaders, faith-based organizations and religious communities to share in the responsibility of implementing the Post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals, in the monitoring and evaluation of progress, and ensuring the universal application and ultimate success of the SDGs by 2030.

The Faith-based Action Framework to End Extreme Poverty and Realize the SDGs (español) outlines a series of strategies that faith leaders and communities are committed to in order to help end the scourge of extreme poverty and advance sustainable development—by restoring right relationships among people, affirming human dignity, and opening the door to the holistic development of all people.

The Framework is organized around three core commitments that emanate from the moral imperative statement. First, the commitment to generate and be guided by evidence. Second, the commitment to advocate by engaging the moral authority of religious leaders and their substantial constituencies. Advocacy will be pivotal for holding governments and other development actors accountable to their promises related to the SDGs. Third, the commitment to foster more effective collaboration between religious and other development actors, including governments, the World Bank Group, the United Nations and the private sector.

The three working groups are Advocacy, Evidence and Collaboration, under an executive committee.

Intersections between the Tasks of the Moral Imperative Working Groups >> 

 

Work Plan for the Advocacy Working Group

1. Review and refine the objectives and actions of the Advocacy pillar of the Action Framework
2. Develop strategies to implement the objectives and actions included in the Framework at national, regional, and global levels (if appropriate)
3. Identify additional specific, advocacy-related objectives or projects of interest to members, and connect members pursuing those projects with resources and contacts
A work plan will be developed and will specify:
– Specific objectives and scope of work of the Working Group
– Actions to be taken by the Working Group members
– Timeline
– Responsibilities

Terms of Reference for Advocacy Working Group >>

Minutes

Members of the Moral Imperative Initiative

PRINCIPAL

ORGANIZATION

PROXY

Adam Taylor World Bank Group
Andrew Hassett World Vision International Christo Greyling
Asavari Herwadkar Ojus Medical Institute
Azza Karam UNFPA – IATF-FBO
Cheryl Morrissey Pax Christi International; FFD NGO UN Committee
Francisco Alvarez Catholic Church of Ecuador
Fred Nyabera Arigatou International End Child Poverty Rebeca Rios-Kohn
Gabriel Salguero National Latino Evangelical Coalition
Garrett Grigsby Christian Connections for International Health
Genie Kagawa NGO Committee on Spirituality, Values
Grove Harris Temple of Understanding
Husna Parvin Ahmad Global One 2015 Shanza Ali
Imrana Umar International Interfaith Peace Corps
Joseph Cornelius Donnelly Caritas Interantionalis
Liberato Bautista United Methodist Church – GBCS
Lynnaia Main The Episcopal Church – Global Relations Mission
Mohamed Ashmawey Islamic Relief Worldwide
Rudelmar Bueno de Faria World Council of Churches Dinesh Suna
Ruth W. Messinger American Jewish World Service Lilach Shafir
Sadhvi Bhagawati Global Interfaith WASH Alliance Pujya Swami Chidanand Saraswati
Moderator Rudelmar Bueno de Faria
Vice-moderator Genie Kagawa