Ecological Justice

Chung Hyun Kyung on Eco-feminism and Earth Spiritualities

Chung Hyun Kyung on Eco-feminism and Earth Spiritualities

Chung Hyun Kyung is a lay theologian of the Presbyterian Church of Korea and a dharma teacher at the Kwan Eum Zen School in New York City. She defines herself as a “salimist” (Korean Eco-feminist) from the Korean word “salim,” which means “making things alive.”

Piper Dumont on the Edible Churchyard

Piper Dumont on the Edible Churchyard

The Edible Churchyard is Union Theological Seminary’s initiative to re-imagine churchyards and rooftops as gardens to revitalize communities, reclaim food-based knowledge, and nourish the land and our bodies.

RIO+20 – Interfaith Response to Sustainable Development

RIO+20 – Interfaith Response to Sustainable Development

What does religion have to do with sustainable development? Religions help people shape their worldview and and act on their values. The Interfaith Consortium for Ecological Civilization works toward the transformation of consciousness needed to make necessary life-style changes to assure sustainability.

Reflections on the Commission on Sustainable Development

Reflections on the Commission on Sustainable Development

The Final Earth Negotiation Bulletin reports the failure of the latest Commission on Sustainable Development. It cites numerous causes of the disaster – overemphasis on the environment to the exclusion of social and economic concerns, the absence of finance ministers who are replaced by environmentalists representing governments, the absence of enforcement conditions for CSD -17, and, above all, a politicized debating format leading to language refinement but not to action.

2011 Is the International Year of Forests

2011 Is the International Year of Forests

Forests are the most biologically-diverse ecosystems on land, home to more than half of the terrestrial species of animals, plants and insects. Forests also provide shelter, jobs and security for forest-dependent populations. Yet despite all of these priceless ecological, economic, social and health benefits, we are destroying the very forests we need to survive.

Eco-Justice Now, by Joan Kirby, RSCJ

Eco-Justice Now, by Joan Kirby, RSCJ

Because the world’s richest nations have contributed more to climate change, we have a greater responsibility to take action – and to do it quickly. It is time to cry out for ecojustice.

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