Ecological Justice

The Temple of Understanding has been advocating for environmental justice for more than a decade, walking the talk about Interfaith values and our climate emergency. Most of our programs pursue eco-justice, and we engage on the local levels where we live. Currently, we are offering a monthly dialogue series among our other work.

Eco Justice for All YouTube Channel

Updates:

TOU and People of the Earth Address the Fukushima Crisis

TOU and People of the Earth Address the Fukushima Crisis

“Our collective future as human beings is in our hands. We must address the Fukushima nuclear crisis and all actions that may violate the Creator’s Natural Law. We have reached the crossroads of life and the end of our existence. We will avert this potentially catastrophic nuclear disaster by coming together with good minds and prayer as a global community of all faiths.” –Chief Arvol Looking Horse, 19th Generation Keeper of the Sacred White Buffalo Calf Pipe and Spiritual Leader of the Great Sioux Nation

Trebbe Johnson – Aphrodite at the Landfill

Trebbe Johnson – Aphrodite at the Landfill

Aphrodite at the Landfill is a rousing call to readers to turn their attention to the kinds of places most people would rather forget: the clearcut forests, paved wetlands, fracked farms, and polluted rivers that once were beautiful and meaningful and now are under assault. Yet when the places we love are damaged, we humans hurt too.

Chung Hyun Kyung on Eco-feminism and Earth Spiritualities

Chung Hyun Kyung on Eco-feminism and Earth Spiritualities

Chung Hyun Kyung is a lay theologian of the Presbyterian Church of Korea and a dharma teacher at the Kwan Eum Zen School in New York City. She defines herself as a “salimist” (Korean Eco-feminist) from the Korean word “salim,” which means “making things alive.”

Piper Dumont on the Edible Churchyard

Piper Dumont on the Edible Churchyard

The Edible Churchyard is Union Theological Seminary’s initiative to re-imagine churchyards and rooftops as gardens to revitalize communities, reclaim food-based knowledge, and nourish the land and our bodies.

RIO+20 – Interfaith Response to Sustainable Development

RIO+20 – Interfaith Response to Sustainable Development

What does religion have to do with sustainable development? Religions help people shape their worldview and and act on their values. The Interfaith Consortium for Ecological Civilization works toward the transformation of consciousness needed to make necessary life-style changes to assure sustainability.

Reflections on the Commission on Sustainable Development

Reflections on the Commission on Sustainable Development

The Final Earth Negotiation Bulletin reports the failure of the latest Commission on Sustainable Development. It cites numerous causes of the disaster – overemphasis on the environment to the exclusion of social and economic concerns, the absence of finance ministers who are replaced by environmentalists representing governments, the absence of enforcement conditions for CSD -17, and, above all, a politicized debating format leading to language refinement but not to action.

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