#CSW62 – 2018 Commission on the Status of Women

Grove Harris, TOU UN Representative:

As always, this year’s CSW was intense and complex. The Temple of Understanding’s sessions were highly successful, and we anticipate sharing video from the panel in the near future.  A hallmark of the Temple’s spiritual work is joining heart, body and mind, and learning deeply from the wide array of international speakers inside and outside of the UN. 

Our CSW speaker Dr Veena Adige with two generations of her family and executive director Alison Van Dyk. One secret to a good panel is gathering beforehand to share refreshments and get to know each other personally.

 

Dr Veena Adige, our panelist from India, described CSW62 as follows:

The Kaleidoscope of the thousands of women who attended the CSW62 revealed that women the world over have similar problems, solutions and thinking. The energy, the excitement and exchange of ideas can be transformed into a better world for all. Though women who live in rural areas are at a higher risk of being left behind, the 50-50 in 2030 can soon become a reality. I saw that there was no discrimination among the delegates, there were instant friendships made, business contacts fixed and future plans made. There was laughter in the cafes in the UN but pin drop silence during the sessions. Temple of Understanding certainly paved the way to better understanding of people and situations. I enjoyed the whole program.

 

Listening to women peacemakers, who struggle for lasting peace based on justice.

 

The Women’s Major Group (WMG) holds introductory and strategy sessions when so many women members from around the world are in NYC for the CSW.

 

TOU Executive Director Alison Van Dyk reported that:

There were two main concerns from women around the world at the CSW parallel events this year: the persistent practice of FGM [female genital mutilation] and the trafficking of young women. What I heard in workshop after workshop was like a déjà vu of the UN Woman’s Conference in Beijing in 1995 but with the uncomfortable realization that things have gotten worse, not better. It is criminal that women are still being subjected to the dangerous practice of FGM and that worldwide, women have to put up with a nightmarish situation of sexual abuse, condoned and coordinated by a cartel that is lethal and spans the globe.  Non-profit organizations are valiantly trying to stop these horrific conditions, but their work feels like a mere drop in the bucket. The question we have to ask ourselves is: why has this gotten so out of control?  

 

The assassination of City Council member Marielle Franco of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil during the CSW brought home again the need to defend our women human rights defenders around the globe.

Listening to Emilia Reyes after her meeting with the Philippine Mission. We protested the listing of activists as terrorists, and the government listened.

 

Our colleagues report on successful negotiations inside the UN. Using “family” allows for diversity and is generally much broader than “the family,” which implies a stereotypical nuclear family. This was a huge win in the negotiations. Conservative groups also reported success because sexual orientation language was dropped from the outcome document. Multilateral negotiations are battles of strategy and compromise.

Good friends Sakena Yacoobi and Audrey Kitagawa after the memorial service. It’s so important to have time and space to share values, pain, memories and spirit.

 

Peaceful protest is a civil responsibility and an act of solidarity.

 

The experience of coming to CSW is empowering for many women. Louisa Eikhomun, the Executive Director of Echoes of Women in Africa, writes in detail of her experience, and commends Women Thrive Alliance for making it possible for grassroots women to attend and raise their concerns. 

Photos by Grove Harris

2017 UN Commission on the Status of Women Report (CSW61)

The Temple of Understanding collaboratively organized three successful sessions and an interfaith service of remembrance during the 61st Annual Commission on the Status of Women

TOU board members and attendees at CSW61

 

For the overall proceedings, we suggest this report by colleague Kate Lappin, of APWLD and the Women’s Major Group, who assessed Four wins at CSW this year:

  1. Committing to gender responsive just transitions in the context of climate change
  2. Recognising the role of trade unions in addressing economic inequalities and the gender pay gap
  3. More detailed methods to ensure the redistribution of unpaid care work
  4. Referring to the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (DRIP)  [Read more]

Also recommended is the Report on CSW61 and Analysis of the Agreed Conclusions by Ms. Lakshmi Puri, UN Assistant Secretary-General and Deputy Executive Director of UN Women.

 

Interfaith Service of Remembrance, CSW61

 

This year’s interfaith service again remembered women murdered for standing up for their rights. Four months after the death of Berta Cáceres, her colleague Lesbia Yaneth Urquia was murdered for the same work: trying to stop a hydroelectric project that threatened water and land. The Council of Indigenous People of Honduras (Copinh) is quoted as writing, “The death of Lesbia Yaneth is a political femicide that tries to silence the voices of women with the courage and bravery to defend their rights.”

 

Roberto Mukaro Borrerro, Grove Harris, Betty Lyons

 

Our joint DPI/NGO session was entitled “Women as Roots of Change: Sustainable Food Production and Sovereignty.” Speakers included Sister Celine Paramunda, Medical Mission Sisters; Betty Lyons (Onondaga Nation), American Indian Law Alliance; Roberto Mukaro Borrerro, International Indian Treaty Council; and Dr. Chantal Line Carpentier, Chief, New York UNCTAD. It was a pleasure to collaborate with DPI colleagues Hawa Diallo, who brilliantly introduced the panel, and the production team including Krystal Fruscella and Chioma Onwumelu (all pictured below).

Our full crew: Women as Roots of Change DPI/NGO Session at CSW61

 

The complete session can be viewed on UN Web TV by clicking the image below: 

 

Our session “On a Gender-Just and Sustainable Trade Agenda,” co-sponsored by UNCTAD and the Women’s Major Group, both highlighted the need for more advocacy towards a gendered understanding of trade policies, and commended women’s activism in pushing for it. UNCTAD has a set of online publications that are part of their gender initiative. They write, “Taking into account gender perspectives in macro-economic policy, including trade policy, is essential to pursuing inclusive and sustainable development and to achieving fairer and beneficial outcomes for all.”

This event, held in the Ex-Press Bar, was hugely successful. The room was filled to capacity (over 80 people) and the audience included a graduate class of women training in international affairs.

Grove Harris, Kate Lappin, Chantal Line Carpentier

 

Grove Harris moderated and showed the film, Roots of Change: Food Sovereignty, Women and Eco-Justice. Speaker Kate Lappin was brilliant, explaining that development funding reverts profits back to the donor countries and further demystifying trade. Then Dr. Chantal Line Carpentier congratulated women’s activism, which has driven UNCTAD’s new gender and trade initiative. After the panel, Dr. Carpentier expressed appreciation for the opportunity to keep working with the NGO community on trade and financial concerns.

Speakers from the floor included Alina Saba, an Indigenous youth from Nepal who spoke to a community perspective, rather than an implicitly individualistic one. Nick Anton spoke on the new People’s Water Guide, and Ana Alvarez brought up the issue of corporate power. Theresa Blumenfield questioned UNCTAD’s uncritical acceptance of the corporate strategy of developing robots to avoid paying human workers.

Celine Paramunda, Crystal Simeoni, Grove Harris

 

Our session “Roots of Change: Reclaiming Economics for Women and Community” gave the audience an opportunity to exchange personal views and voice heartfelt concerns. We are especially grateful for the presence of speakers Crystal Simeoni of FEMNET and Sister Celine Paramunda of Medical Mission Sisters. Simeoni’s background in rural economic development and fighting inequality was coupled with clarity and insight. Sr. Paramunda offered heartfelt remarks on women’s leadership and spirit. She also led a brief meditation about breath and relationship, relating us to trees and the cycle of oxygen and carbon dioxide.

FEMNET, the African Women’s Development and Communication Network, offered a set of Red Flags expressing grave concerns about the direction of CSW61. Naming eighteen areas of concern, they warn, “The 61st session of the UN Commission on the Status of Women is heading toward a weak, even regressive, outcome that fails to address the current state of the world of work, let alone address future challenges.” These areas will require ongoing monitoring and activism.

 

 

Women as Roots of Change: Sustainable Food Production and Sovereignty (CSW61)

The UN Department of Public Information (DPI),
in partnership with the Temple of Understanding, presents

Women as Roots of Change: Sustainable Food Production and Sovereignty

Part of the 61st Commission on the Status of Women (Side Event)

 Thursday, March 23, 2017, 11 am – 12:45 pm
Conference Room 2, United Nations Headquarters, New York

 

Building on the intersections between Sustainable Development Goals 2, 5, and 6, this briefing will feature the voices of Indigenous people and highlight women’s leadership role in sustainable food production and sovereignty.

Featuring:

  • Sister Celine Paramunda, Medical Mission Sisters
  • Betty Lyons (Onondaga Nation), American Indian Law Alliance
  • Roberto Mukaro Borrerro, International Indian Treaty Council
  • Dr. Chantal Line Carpentier, Chief, New York UNCTAD

The relevant Sustainable Development Goals include:

2. Zero Hunger
5. Gender Equality
6. Clean Water and Sanitation

The Temple is extremely grateful to Tribal Link for their collaboration on this event.

 

 

 

Click for PDF flyer >>

 

 

On A Gender-Just & Sustainable Trade Agenda (CSW61)

On A Gender-Just & Sustainable Trade Agenda

Part of the 61st Commission on the Status of Women

Monday, March 20, 2017, 1:15 – 2:30 pm
Ex-Press Bar, Third Floor
United Nations HQ, New York

This panel will consider the impacts of international trade on women’s empowerment in diverse countries, as well as the systemic human rights issues involved. We will explore the potential for trade to support Sustainable Development Goal 5 and be a tool to redress economic imbalances. Economic justice must be strengthened using research, data, education and effective implementation. UNCTAD’s research, mandate, potential and challenges will be presented. 
 
We will consider the use of a human rights frame: the Human Right to Food and the Human Right to Water (SDG 6) are particularly relevant to women as small farmers and food providers. We will also address women’s ownership of land and/or resources and women’s unpaid labor. Women’s voices from India, El Salvador and the US will be brought in via a short film to frame the gravity of the concerns and call for an inclusive bounty.
 
 

Panelists

  • Grove Harris, Temple of Understanding, moderating and introducing short film Roots of Change: Food Sovereignty, Women and Eco-Justice
  • Chantal Line Carpentier, PhD, Chief, UNCTAD New York Office
  • Kate Lappin, Regional Coordinator, Asia Pacific Forum on Women, Law and Development (APWLD)
  • Respondents, with local/regional updates and promising practices

 

Organizer

Temple of Understanding

 

Co-Sponsors

United Nations Conference on Trade & Development (UNCTAD)
Women’s Major Group
Mining Working Group

 

Links

UNCTAD – Trade, Gender and Development
http://unctad.org/en/Pages/DITC/Gender-and-Trade/Trade,-Gender-and-Development.aspx

Women’s Major Group Joint Statement – UNCTAD 14

http://apwld.org/womens-major-group-joint-statement-unctad-14/ 

Temple of Understanding – Food Sovereignty
https://templeofunderstanding.org/what-we-do/food/

Food Sovereignty, Women & Sustainability, 3/18/16 at UN CSW

Food Sovereignty, Women & Sustainability:
The Roots of System Change

2016 United Nations Commission on the Status of Women
Friday, March 18, 2016
Salvation Army (SA), 221 E. 52nd St., New York
8:30 AM in the auditorium

Chantal Line Carpentier, Nina Simons, Jen Kopec, Grove Harris

Chantal Line Carpentier, Nina Simons, Jen Kopec, Grove Harris

 

This panel explored access to healthy food as a lens toward understanding the interconnections of all our equity and sustainability issues. Ensuring sustainable food for all is clearly both a practical and a moral effort; faith communities have long been committed to this. Access to decent food can be seen as a crosscutting issue through all the Sustainable Development Goals; it touches on justice, sovereignty, health, climate change, water, economy, faith and world peace, and women’s leadership in all these arenas. The nourishment, health, economics, sustainability and peace of families, communities and nation states improve as the leadership and literacy of women increase.

Panelists reflected from their diverse perspectives on specific strategies towards food sovereignty for all, as well as what sustains them in their work, both in literal food and in spirit. Meeting this most basic human need can illuminate a path towards a healthier and more just future.

Speakers:

Chantal Line Carpentier, chief, New York UNCTAD Office
Nina Simons, co-founder of Bioneers
Jen Kopec, intuitive healer, consciousness in food and body

Moderator:

Grove Harris, Representative to the United Nations, Temple of Understanding

Sponsors:

Temple of Understanding
Bioneers
UNCTAD New York
Parliament of World’s Religions
Mining Working Group
Feminist Task Force

Click for a printable flyer >>

Interfaith Service at UN CSW, 3/18/16

CSW Interfaith Service 2016

Interfaith Service of Remembrance and Gratitude

2016 United Nations Commission on the Status of Women
Friday, March 18, 2016, 6:00pm
Chapel of the Church Center for the United Nations
New York, New York

The Temple of Understanding is a co-sponsor and organizing partner of the “Interfaith Service of Remembrance and Gratitude” which was held Friday, March 18th in the Chapel of the Church Center for the United Nations as part of the 2016 Commission on the Status of Women.

Power, Health, Sustainability: Women Challenging Extractive Industries

 Power, Health, Sustainability:
Women Challenging Oil, Gas and Other Extractive Industries

This is a Temple of Understanding side event for the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW).

Date:  March 12, 2015
Time: 2:30 pm
Venue: Armenian Convention Center, New York CIty
Room Assignment: Ballroom 1

Speakers:

Riki Ott: Author, Activist, Public Speaker — ” We have the power to stop the oil industry and the federal government from doing more harm. It is time to exercise our power in our communities.”

Nina Simons: President and Co-Founder of Bioneers, Founder of Everywoman’s Leadership and Co-Founder- Cultivating Women’s Leadership, programs of Bioneers- Nina Simons is an award-winning social entrepreneur and visionary thinker.