Indigenous Issues Events April 25 & 26 in NYC

Held during the 2017 United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in New York City, these events are open to the public!

The Mining Working Group (a coalition of which TOU is a member), the Pan-Amazon Ecclesial Network (REPAM), and the NGO Committee on Indigenous Peoples will host:

 

Indigenous Stories, South & North
What is the Impact of UNDRIP?  [Flyer]

Tuesday, April 25th, 2:00 – 4:00PM
Salvation Army
221 E. 52nd Street, New York, NY

Indigenous Peoples’ Human, Land & Water Rights
Cases from the Amazonian Region and Beyond  [Flyer]

Wednesday, April 26th,
9:30AM – 12:00PM
Church Center 10th Floor
777 UN Plaza, New York, NY

 

Additionally, the Center for Earth Ethics, the Interfaith Center of New York, the Parliament of the World’s Religions, and the Seventh Generation Fund for Indigenous Peoples will sponsor:

 

Indigenous Peoples and Climate Change: A Panel and Discussion

Wednesday, April 26, 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Episcopal Church Center
815 Second Avenue, Ground Floor

Chase Iron Eyes (Standing Rock Sioux) Lakota People’s Law Project
Mindahi Crescencio Bastida Muñoz (Otomi) Otomi-Hñahñu Regional Council, Mexico
Tawera Tahuna (Maori: Nga Ariki Kaiputahi) Seventh Generation Fund for Indigenous Peoples
Naomi Lanoi (Masaai) Human Rights Advocate

 

 

 

 

Women as Roots of Change: Sustainable Food Production and Sovereignty (CSW61)

The UN Department of Public Information (DPI),
in partnership with the Temple of Understanding, presents

Women as Roots of Change: Sustainable Food Production and Sovereignty

Part of the 61st Commission on the Status of Women (Side Event)

 Thursday, March 23, 2017, 11 am – 12:45 pm
Conference Room 2, United Nations Headquarters, New York

 

Building on the intersections between Sustainable Development Goals 2, 5, and 6, this briefing will feature the voices of Indigenous people and highlight women’s leadership role in sustainable food production and sovereignty.

Featuring:

  • Sister Celine Paramunda, Medical Mission Sisters
  • Betty Lyons (Onondaga Nation), American Indian Law Alliance
  • Roberto Mukaro Borrerro, International Indian Treaty Council
  • Dr. Chantal Line Carpentier, Chief, New York UNCTAD

The relevant Sustainable Development Goals include:

2. Zero Hunger
5. Gender Equality
6. Clean Water and Sanitation

The Temple is extremely grateful to Tribal Link for their collaboration on this event.

 

 

 

Click for PDF flyer >>

 

 

#NoDAPL – Comfort and Action as Construction Resumes

Via the Mining Working Group at the UN:

As I am sure many of you have heard, the easement has been granted for the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. While I am deeply heartbroken, I think it’s crucial to stay involved and aware of all coming updates and opportunities to unite.
 
 
 
We also recommend the Viceland series on Standing Rock, one of the best collections of footage of the demonstrations.
 
 

Roots of Change: Reclaiming Economics for Women and Community (CSW61)

Roots of Change: Reclaiming Economics for Women and Community

Part of the 61st Commission on the Status of Women

Thursday, March 16, 10:30 am
Salvation Army, Downstairs
221 E 52nd Street, New York, NY 10022

 

Women’s opportunity and necessity has traditionally been in farming and textiles. It is crucial to re-vision women’s roles in a broader context. Women’s economic empowerment needs to involve equity, ownership, and a community focus. Our 10-minute film Roots of Change: Food Sovereignty, Women and Eco-Justice demonstrates the dangers we face as corporations replace local family farms and fisheries. It features women’s perspectives and includes men on all levels, suggesting the values we need to foster in order to reclaim our economic future.

Speakers will address concerns such as loss of local knowledge, community based solutions, innovative practices, and the impacts of international trade. In our interconnected world, women’s empowerment lies in a robust local community as well as justice in the global community.

Speakers:

  • Sister Celine Paramunda, Medical Mission Sisters
  • Crystal Simeoni, FEMNET
  • Grove Harris, Temple of Understanding

Co-sponsored by the Temple of Understanding, the Women’s Major Group, and the Mining Working Group.

On A Gender-Just & Sustainable Trade Agenda (CSW61)

On A Gender-Just & Sustainable Trade Agenda

Part of the 61st Commission on the Status of Women

Monday, March 20, 2017, 1:15 – 2:30 pm
Ex-Press Bar, Third Floor
United Nations HQ, New York

This panel will consider the impacts of international trade on women’s empowerment in diverse countries, as well as the systemic human rights issues involved. We will explore the potential for trade to support Sustainable Development Goal 5 and be a tool to redress economic imbalances. Economic justice must be strengthened using research, data, education and effective implementation. UNCTAD’s research, mandate, potential and challenges will be presented. 
 
We will consider the use of a human rights frame: the Human Right to Food and the Human Right to Water (SDG 6) are particularly relevant to women as small farmers and food providers. We will also address women’s ownership of land and/or resources and women’s unpaid labor. Women’s voices from India, El Salvador and the US will be brought in via a short film to frame the gravity of the concerns and call for an inclusive bounty.
 
 

Panelists

  • Grove Harris, Temple of Understanding, moderating and introducing short film Roots of Change: Food Sovereignty, Women and Eco-Justice
  • Chantal Line Carpentier, PhD, Chief, UNCTAD New York Office
  • Kate Lappin, Regional Coordinator, Asia Pacific Forum on Women, Law and Development (APWLD)
  • Respondents, with local/regional updates and promising practices

 

Organizer

Temple of Understanding

 

Co-Sponsors

United Nations Conference on Trade & Development (UNCTAD)
Women’s Major Group
Mining Working Group

 

Links

UNCTAD – Trade, Gender and Development
http://unctad.org/en/Pages/DITC/Gender-and-Trade/Trade,-Gender-and-Development.aspx

Women’s Major Group Joint Statement – UNCTAD 14

http://apwld.org/womens-major-group-joint-statement-unctad-14/ 

Temple of Understanding – Food Sovereignty
http://templeofunderstanding.org/what-we-do/food/

The Women’s March on Washington in Pictures – January 21, 2017

From Grove Harris, TOU Main Representative to the United Nations:

This gathering of a million people was so large that actual marching was pretty limited. (With 600,000 confirmed people on public transportation, it had to be larger than estimates.) From the crowds on the metro platforms to the solid masses in the streets, it was a time to slow down and enjoy the thoughtfulness of people’s expressions. I enjoyed handing out cards about our online video, Roots of Change: Food Sovereignty, Women and Eco-Justice, and listening to most of the speakers online later.

People came together peacefully to reclaim our democracy, to affirm women’s humanity and rights, and to celebrate reclaiming our streets and our capital. We found common ground for collective action.  It was a powerful affirmation of renewed civic engagement.

 

Enjoy these images from the march! Photo credits: Grove Harris

"Still Indigenous. Still Strong. Still Here." - seen on sign at the DC Women's March on 1/21/17

“Still Indigenous. Still Strong. Still Here.”

 

"They tried to bury us. They didn't know we were seeds." - seen on sign at the DC Women's March on 1/21/17

“They tried to bury us. They didn’t know we were seeds.”

 

"Super Callous Fragile Racist Extra Bragadocious" - seen on sign at the DC Women's March on 1/21/17

“Super Callous Fragile Racist Extra Bragadocious”

 

"The oppression of women belongs in a museum" - seen on sign at the DC Women's March on 1/21/17

“The oppression of women belongs in a museum”

 

"More Planned Parenthood = Fewer Abortions" - seen on sign at the DC Women's March on 1/21/17

“More Planned Parenthood = Fewer Abortions”

 

"Anger and intolerance are the enemies of correct understanding." --Gandhi, seen on sign at the DC Women's March on 1/21/17

“Anger and intolerance are the enemies of correct understanding.” –Gandhi

 

"There is no safety. The dance has always been danced at the edge of the abyss." -Ursula K. LeGuin, seen on sign at the DC Women's March on 1/21/17

“There is no safety. The dance has always been danced at the edge of the abyss.” -Ursula K. LeGuin

 

"Resistance is built on HOPE" - seen on sign at the DC Women's March on 1/21/17

“Resistance is built on HOPE”

“We beg for your forgiveness”: Veterans Apologize to Native Elders #StandingRock

Via Salon.com:

Wes Clark Jr., the son of retired U.S. Army general and former supreme commander at NATO Wesley Clark Sr., was part of a group of veterans at Standing Rock one day after the Army Corps announcement. The veterans joined Native American tribal elders in a ceremony celebrating the Dakota Access Pipeline easement denial.

Lakota spiritual leader and medicine man Chief Leonard Crow Dog and Standing Rock Sioux spokeswoman Phyllis Young were among several Native elders who spoke, thanking the veterans for standing in solidarity during the protests.

Clark got into formation by rank, with his veterans, and knelt before the elders asking for their forgiveness for the long brutal history between the United States and Native Americans:

“Many of us, me particularly, are from the units that have hurt you over the many years. We came. We fought you. We took your land. We signed treaties that we broke. We stole minerals from your sacred hills. We blasted the faces of our presidents onto your sacred mountain. When we took still more land and then we took your children and then we tried to make your language and we tried to eliminate your language that God gave you, and the Creator gave you. We didn’t respect you, we polluted your Earth, we’ve hurt you in so many ways but we’ve come to say that we are sorry. We are at your service and we beg for your forgiveness.”

Read more on the Veterans’ apology to Native elders >>

Click the image to watch powerful footage of the Veterans’ apology to Native elders:

Veterans-Apology-to-Native-Elders

Dakota Pipeline Halted — Take Action to Stop the Construction for Good #StandingRock #NoDAPL

On December 4, the department of the Army announced that it will not approve an easement that will allow the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline to cross under Lake Oahe. The following statement was released by Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Chairman Dave Archambault II.

“Today, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced that it will not be granting the easement to cross Lake Oahe for the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline. Instead, the Corps will be undertaking an environmental impact statement to look at possible alternative routes…”

Read the complete statement at StandWithStandingRock.net >>

 

Take Action

But the fight is not over! So long as the project is still being funded, it may move forward at a later date. Please take action to cut off the Dakota Pipeline’s funding.

“While the US Army Corps continues its consultation with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe about the river crossing, the Dakota Access pipeline project is in financial jeopardy.  It is likely impossible for the company to meet its January 1 deadline, and if it does not, producers and shippers who two years ago committed to use the pipeline will have the option to renegotiate or even terminate their contracts… In August, a group of banks agreed to lend $2.5 billion to Dakota Access. But $1.4 billion of this loan is still on hold until the Army Corps grants the final permits for the pipeline. This means that there is still time for the banks involved in this loan to cut their line of credit.”

Target the 17 banks funding the pipeline and demand they divest from the project — read more on HonorEarth.org >>

You can also join MoveOn.org in thanking the Standing Rock Sioux community and/or contributing financially to the tribe.

monthofactionmeme1

TOU Stands with Standing Rock #StandingRock #NoDAPL

Standing with Standing Rock

The Temple of Understanding stands with Standing Rock! Grove Harris, our Main Representative to the United Nations, is pictured (third from the right) with interns from Peace Boat US, which does peace missions around the world. This shot was taken on Nov. 15 on the way to a rally in support of Standing Rock protesters.

Demand that your bank stop financially supporting the Dakota Access Pipeline

Via SumOfUs.org:

Over 100 water protectors were brutally arrested by Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) security forces — some locked in dog kennels and shot at with rubber bullets and pepper spray — just for standing up for their ancestral lands and our most precious resource, water.

Thousands have peacefully gathered in person and in solidarity to stop this 570,000 barrel-per-day pipeline that would endanger the water and ancestral lands of the Standing Rock Sioux. People around the world have donated, showed up in person, and millions used Facebook’s ‘check in’ function in solidarity just this week.

And while this inspiring work is going on, the banks that we use every day are backing the project with hundreds of millions of dollars in loans and investment each.

Demand that your bank stop financially supporting the Dakota Access Pipeline and associated projects such as Energy Transfer now. >>

Big News! Norway-based Bank DNB just announced it is reconsidering its financing of the Dakota Access Pipeline project. This is thanks your support and the brave water defenders who have been on the front lines standing up for the ancestral lands of the Standing Rock Sioux and our water.

 

Please add your name to the petition!